41. The Secret Service Embraces the Future with Robin Champ

Episode 41 September 02, 2021 00:20:00
41. The Secret Service Embraces the Future with Robin Champ
The Convergence - An Army Mad Scientist Podcast
41. The Secret Service Embraces the Future with Robin Champ
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Show Notes

Robin Champ is the Chief of the Enterprise Strategy Division at the United States Secret Service (USSS), where she leads both foresight and strategic planning for the organization. Prior to joining USSS, Ms. Champ was the Chief of the Global Futures Office at the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA).  Prior to joining DTRA, Ms. Champ worked at the Defense Logistics Agency (DLA), Office of Strategic Planning and Enterprise Transformation (J-5), where she was the DLA Lead for the 2010 Quadrennial Defense Review.  In addition to her official positions, Ms. Champ Co-Leads the Federal Foresight Community of Interest (see links below). She also is a guest lecturer on foresight at George Washington University’s “Mastering Strategy for the Public Sector” course.

In today’s podcast, Ms. Champ discusses women leading in national security, empowering diversity to think about the future, and how emerging technologies and trends will affect Secret Service missions.  The following bullet points highlight key insights from our interview:

Stay tuned to the Mad Scientist Laboratory for our next episode of The ConvergenceGlobal Entanglement and Multi-Reality Warfare — featuring COL Stefan Banach (USA-Ret.), Director, Army Management Staff College, discussing global entanglement, multi-reality warfare, and the urgent need for a new paradigm and cognitive approach to warfare for the U.S. Army and larger Joint Force.

 If you enjoyed this post and episode, explore the following related content:

Going on the Offensive in the Fight for the Future, and the associated podcast

The Convergence: The Future of Talent and Soldiers with MAJ Delaney Brown, CPT Jay Long, and 1LT Richard Kuzma, and the associated podcast

Young Minds on Competition and Conflict

Emergent Global Trends Impacting on the Future Operational Environment

Learning about the Future through Podcasts

Extremism on the Horizon: The Challenges of VEO Innovation, by Colonel Montgomery Erfourth and Dr. Aaron Bazin

Four Models of the Post-COVID World, The Operational Environment: Now through 2028, and The 2 + 3 Threat video

The Future Operational Environment: The Four Worlds of 2035-2050, the complete AFC Pamphlet 525-2, Future Operational Environment: Forging the Future in an Uncertain World 2035-2050, and associated video

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