19. The Psychology of Terrorism and Disinformation with Dr. Aleks Nesic

Episode 19 September 17, 2020 00:41:22
19. The Psychology of Terrorism and Disinformation with Dr. Aleks Nesic
The Convergence - An Army Mad Scientist Podcast
19. The Psychology of Terrorism and Disinformation with Dr. Aleks Nesic
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Show Notes

In today’s podcast, Dr. Nesic discusses how humans remain at the center of great power competition — “everything else are simply mechanisms being used to influence the human element” — and how we must understand the human domain and synchronize social science in the non-kinetic, non-lethal space if we are to successfully out-compete our adversaries:

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