28. The Next Ten Years of Tech with Eli Dourado

Episode 28 February 04, 2021 00:40:03
28. The Next Ten Years of Tech with Eli Dourado
The Convergence - An Army Mad Scientist Podcast
28. The Next Ten Years of Tech with Eli Dourado
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Show Notes

Eli Dourado is a senior research fellow at the Center for Growth and Opportunity (CGO) at Utah State University. He focuses on the hard technology and innovation needed to drive large increases in economic growth — speeding up infrastructure deployment, eliminating barriers to entrepreneurs operating in the physical world, and getting the most out of federal technology research programs. He has worked on a wide range of technology policy issues, including aviation, Internet governance, and cryptocurrency. His popular writing has appeared in The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post, and Foreign Policy, among other outlets.

In today’s podcast, Mr. Dourado discusses technology opportunities in the next decade, the economic impact of shifting technology trends, and their impact on global security.  The following bullet points highlight key insights from our interview with him:

Stay tuned to the Mad Scientist Laboratory for our next episode of “The Convergence,” featuring Mr. Shawn Steene (OSD Policy) and Mr. Michael Meier (HQDA OTJAG), discussing the ground truth on regulations and directives regarding lethal autonomy and what the future of autonomy for the force might mean in a complex threat environment on 18 February 2021!

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