Disinformation, Revisionism, and China with Doowan Lee

Episode Episode 23. Redux August 19, 2021 00:46:20
Disinformation, Revisionism, and China with Doowan Lee
The Convergence - An Army Mad Scientist Podcast
Disinformation, Revisionism, and China with Doowan Lee
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Show Notes

Today’s episode of “The Convergencepodcast features our conversation with Mr. Doowan Lee, CEO, VAST-OSINT and Board Advisor, Zignal Labs, originally published last October. Mr. Lee is a National Security expert in influence intelligence, disinformation analysis, data analytics, network visualization, and great power competition. Before joining Zignal Labs, Mr. Lee served as a professor and principal investigator at the Naval Postgraduate School, where he executed federally funded projects on collaborative information systems, network analysis, and disinformation analysis. His article entitled The United States Isn’t Doomed to Lose the Information Wars explores Russian and Chinese disinformation campaigns and was featured in Foreign Policy last fall.

The following bullet points highlight key insights from our interview with Mr. Lee:

- Nations talking about the spread of open societies are attempting to undermine the CCP.

- The CCP will maintain positive control of all media.

- The CCP will professionalize information operations.

This policy resulted in the development of the “Great Firewall,” the “Golden Shield" project, and the PLA’s Strategic Support Forces.

- Information Operations are not irregular warfare. DROP THE ADJECTIVE! There is nothing irregular about these operations and they are probably the most regular or everyday form of competition we face.

- Embrace our doctrine. We are not using our tools such as international or bilateral exercises for advantage, while our adversaries are using these exercises, oftentimes in the same contested space, to their information advantage.

- Stop trying to make perfect decisions. Instead, work to perfect decision making using rapid experimentation, learning, and implementation.

 

Stay tuned to the Mad Scientist Laboratory for our next podcast with Robin Champ, Chief, Enterprise Strategy Division, U.S. Secret Service, discussing women leading in national security, empowering diversity to think about the future, and how emerging technology and trends like cryptocurrency and cyber warfare will affect Secret Service missions on 2 September 2021!

Episode Transcript

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