54. Crossing the Valley of Death for Innovation with Trish Martinelli and David Schiff

Episode 54 April 07, 2022 00:56:01
54. Crossing the Valley of Death for Innovation with Trish Martinelli and David Schiff
The Convergence - An Army Mad Scientist Podcast
54. Crossing the Valley of Death for Innovation with Trish Martinelli and David Schiff
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Show Notes

National Security Innovation Network (NSIN) is a problem-solving network in the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) that adapts to the emerging needs of those who serve in the defense of our national security. NSIN is dedicated to the work of bringing together defense, academic, and entrepreneurial innovators to solve national security problems in new ways.

 

Trish Martinelli, At-Large Director, NSIN, is an accomplished Senior Intelligence professional with a strong background in business, applicable analysis, and a keen sense of how to implement innovative planning in support of customer satisfaction.  With more than 25 years in Government, Military, Analytical, Middle East, Special Missions and Operations Expertise, she is adept and experienced in working with people of diverse backgrounds to maximize the benefit from relevant experience.

 

David Schiff, At-Large Director, NSIN, is working to change the culture of the DoD and Federal Government to favor innovation as a strategic advantage and strengthen the relationship between civilian industry and the Government to solve the world’s biggest problems.  He seeks to bridge the gap that has developed between these ecosystems by building more collaborative, higher-trust, more empathetic, and creative environments, which will lead to the innovative solutions we need to ensure a better world for future generations.

 

In this episode, Ms. Martinelli and Mr. Schiff discuss innovation, the value of hackathons and crowdsourcing in harnessing the Nation’s intellect to benefit National Security, and integrating their programs in support of U.S. Army innovation. The following bullet points highlight key insights from our interview:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stay tuned for our next episode of The Convergence podcast — To Boldly Go — featuring Steve LeonardMick RyanJon Klug, and Kathleen McInnis, discussing the lessons captured in the book To Boldly Go;  leadership, strategy, and conflict; storytelling; and the value of science fiction.

Episode Transcript

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